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Riverside Ramble - Hebburn

Length of walk

From Hebburn Metro station

Distance: 2.5 miles

Time 1.5 to 2 hours

From the riverside car park

Distance: 1.25 miles

Time 45 mins - 1 hour.

Activity

As you make your way along the walk, see if you can spot the different types of wildlife at the different posts.

Where to start

To access the walk from Hebburn Metro station: 

Walk westwards along Station Road down towards the River Tyne. At the roundabout continue straight ahead down Prince Consort Road. The road will bend sharply to the left and where it turns sharp right you need to continue straight ahead onto the riverside footpath to the information board.

To access the walk from the riverside car park: 

Walk back up Prince Consort Road for a short way to where the riverside footpath meets the road, turn right onto the footpath where there is an information board - this is the start of the trail. The main path running from Prince Consort Road is tarmac but it's bumpy in places and there is a fairly steep bank to get back down to the road along the river.

Step 1

  • The trail begins by following the tarmac riverside footpath up the slope to the first wooden carving of an acorn, which illustrates one of the many tree seeds to be found in the Riverside park.
  • Keep following this path as it runs parallel to the river and discover the second wooden carving, which represents the history of boating on the river.

What to look for: Wildflowers

Along the route you will see a wide variety of wildlife depending on the time of year. A wide range of wildflowers can be found within the park. Goatsbeard is like a dandelion but has an enormous clock of seeds. Bird foot trefoil has leaflets in threes and seedpods like birds' feet. The white trumpet-shaped blooms of great bindweed are the biggest wild flowers in Britain.

What to look for: Butterflies

Many attractive butterflies can be seen during fine weather. Look for the tiny common blue and others including the small tortoiseshell (with its striped forewing), the peacock (named after the eyes on its wings) and the red admiral (which is black and white with vivid red markings).

There are many ideal spots for a picnic with views over the River Tyne.

Step 2

  • Continue along the path for about 250 yards until you reach the third wooden carving which represents one of the numerous wild birds that live and feed along the river.
  • Carry on until the junction of four paths near the fourth wooden carving. It illustrates the wild mushrooms that emerge through the grassland in autumn.

Step 3

  • Turn right down the fairly steep slope to the road and then follow the grassy path alongside the road, back along towards the car park.
  • When you reach the wooden jetty on your left you will see a series of panels in groups of three which are set into the fence. They were designed by local school children in 2004.

Question: Can you see which school they were from?

Map and map key

From car park

Riverside Ramble map

  1. Prince Consort Road
  2. Station Road
  3. Car Park
  4. Sculpture Post
  5. Sculpture Post
  6. Sculpture Post
  7. Sculpture Post
  8. Fence with art panels

From Metro

Riverside Ramble map 2

  1. Prince Consort Road
  2. Station Road
  3. Car Park
  4. Sculpture Post
  5. Sculpture Post
  6. Sculpture Post
  7. Sculpture Post
  8. Fence with art panels